The Real Chinese Countryside Experience

After a visit to all family members in Dali, my friend and I were finally ready to take the bus to the countryside.

Going there is a bit of a mission because of the many different busses you have to take there and when you arrive at your village, you have to tell the driver to stop the bus because there aren’t any bus stops, only if people say stop. So after riding two different mini busses into the countryside, my friend suddenly moved forward and told the driver to stop. We got off at cornfield number… Who knows, there were so many but I spotted a beautiful gate and a long muddy road down through the fields.

cornfield

We walked that way while my friend told me stories of her family and their life in this little village in the middle of nowhere. I learned how people manage to go to school here and how they earn money. This is what I want to tell you about because it’s very interesting to learn more about the farmers life in China, especially because it’s difficult to get to the countryside on your own but also because I have experienced that many urban Chinese talk down upon the farmers and their lives in the countryside so I think it’s rather important for us to learn more about them and their lives.

farmer

chinesevillage

My friend’s father was born and raised in the little village and his brother and sister and mother were still living there. Their mother had been a widow for years now and was having her own little Shop where she sold ice cream to the screaming children and drinks to their hard-working parents. In the back of her shop, the locals gathered to play Majiang which is a very popular Chinese game. I would say it’s the Chinese poker and you can spend hours turning the bricks and playing with friends and family.

chinesehome

chinesedoor

My friend’s uncle and aunt lived inside the village and their daughter was enjoying her summer vacation together with them. Their house consisted of a small courtyard with wild roses growing, a noisy dog, and a bunch of small open rooms. I also found five cows and a room full of silkworms which they were feeding with leaves from their fields behind the village.
The bathroom was a hole out in the sunflower field with a stunning view.

sunflowerfield

The funny thing in the countryside is that all of the houses seem to have a flat-screen TV and everyone owns a smartphone. 3g is working fine but there was only WiFi in one house in the village. That house was owned by the local mining mogul.

chinesegate

The farmers were happily smiling and staring at us when we walked through the village. The muddy paths were running around the massive village houses. The houses here were much bigger than most of the normal villas in Denmark. Most of them with three floors and beautiful gates.

img_20160825_191120

During my stay in the countryside, I got to help in the field where we all went to fetch a lot of leaves. We were bringing them back to the farm because the family was feeding thousands of silkworms and they were hungry. It was really fun to try to work in the fields and yes, I soon realised how hard it was and how many mosquitoes were around!

img_20160825_173034It was fun to be a farmer for a day

After feeding the silkworms, we had our own delicious home-cooked meal and after finishing up the dishes, we went to play Majiang again. It seemed to be the thing the farmers did every evening after work.

This experience was so great. I’m so thankful that I had the chance to explore the countryside as well and I kept thanking my friend’s auntie for inviting me and taking me in as if I was a family member. It made me so happy!

xx lingling

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